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Child Poverty – Dallas, TX

IRP Children and Families News - Fri, 11/17/2017 - 15:33

One in five Dallas-area children lives in poverty, report finds, By Corbett Smith, November 14, 2017, Dallas Morning News: “One in five children in North Texas lives in poverty, with more than 260,000 kids in the area considered food insecure, according to a biennial study released Tuesday from Children’s Health and the University of Texas at Dallas…”

Child Welfare System – Arizona

IRP Children and Families News - Fri, 11/17/2017 - 15:30

Arizona’s foster care boards don’t look like their communities. Here’s why that matters, By Maria Polletta, November 12, 2017, Arizona Republic: “Experts have long recognized inequalities in America’s child-welfare system: When kids share identical circumstances except for race, black and Native American children enter foster care more often, spend more time in the system and wait longer to be adopted. In an attempt to ensure fair treatment for kids taken from their parents, Arizona lawmakers decades ago mandated that Foster Care Review Boards — which help decide the fates of children in foster care — mirror the races, ethnicities and income levels of the communities they serve.  They don’t…”

Kids Count Report – Kentucky

IRP Children and Families News - Wed, 11/15/2017 - 15:33

A quarter of Kentucky kids are living in poverty, survey shows, By Deborah Yetter, November 14, 2017, Louisville Courier Journal: “One-quarter of the state’s children are living below the federal poverty level, according to a report by Kentucky Youth Advocates. Twelve percent of Kentucky children live in extreme poverty, which is below 50 percent of the poverty level. And nearly half of Kentucky’s children live in homes considered low income, or 200 percent of the poverty level, the report found…”

Academic Gaps in Early Childhood

IRP Children and Families News - Fri, 11/10/2017 - 14:46

Study: Academic gaps persist — but haven’t widened — between high- and low-income kindergartners, By Neal Morton, November 6, 2017, Seattle Times: “When education economist Emma García started researching the academic gaps that show up in kindergarten between low-income students and their high-income peers, she had reason to suspect the gaps had widened in recent years…”

Lead Poisoning in Children

IRP Children and Families News - Fri, 11/03/2017 - 12:57
  • Two-thirds of Medicaid-covered children not getting required tests for lead poisoning in Wisconsin, By David Wahlberg, October 26, 2017, Wisconsin State Journal: “Less than a third of Wisconsin children on Medicaid were tested for lead poisoning at ages 1 and 2 last year, despite a federal requirement that all such children get the testing, a new state report says. Children on Medicaid are three times as likely to have lead poisoning than other children, so many children who could face developmental problems from lead exposure are not being identified, a Madison pediatrician said…”
  • State gets OK to spend $15M to aid lead-poisoned children on Medicaid, By Lauren Cross, October 26, 2017, Northwest Indiana Times: “State health officials have been given the green light to spend up to $15 million over the next five years to bolster lead hazard testing and removal efforts in East Chicago, South Bend and other cities where low-income children are at risk for exposure. Much of the focus in East Chicago this past year has been on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s investigation and cleanup of toxic soil left by past industry in the Calumet neighborhoods…”

Kids Count “Race for Results” Report

IRP Children and Families News - Thu, 10/26/2017 - 13:58
  • Children of immigrants experience more poverty, academic failure, report finds, By Michael Alison Chandler, October 24, 2017, Washington Post: “Children of immigrants, who make up 28 percent of all children in Maryland and nearly a quarter of those in Virginia and the District, are more likely to live in chronic poverty and less likely to perform at grade level in school, according to a report being released Tuesday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The report highlights disparities in opportunities for children of immigrants. It also highlights the harder-to-measure impacts of persistent stress on children affected by government policies that result in the profiling, deportation and detention of immigrants…”
  • New report finds racial disparities persist for Louisiana kids, By Wilborn P. Nobles III, October 24, 2017, New Orleans Times-Picayune: “Louisiana is among the toughest places in America for children to grow up, especially if you are black, poor or a child of immigrants, according to a study released Tuesday (Oct. 24). One bright spot? Louisiana has a relatively high rate of kids enrolled in an early children education when compared with other states…”
  • Study: Michigan last in well-being of black children, By Karen Bouffard, October 24, 2017, Detroit News: “African-American children in Michigan fare worse on key indicators of well-being than in any other state in the nation, according to a national study released Tuesday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation…”
  • Report: Oregon schools fall short for children of color, immigrant children, By Natalie Pate, October 25, 2017, Statesman Journal: “Oregon’s children of color and children living in immigrant families are struggling to find the resources and opportunities they need to thrive, according to a report released Tuesday. These children are more likely to live in low-income households, less likely to have access to proper health services and are graduating at lower rates than their white counterparts living in U.S.-born families…”

Relatives Caring for Foster Children

IRP Children and Families News - Thu, 10/26/2017 - 13:47
  • Grandparents raising grandkids grapple with retirement and college costs at the same time, By Danielle Douglas-Gabriel, October 22, 2017, Washington Post: “Each month, 72-year-old Sandra Bursch withdraws $4,200 from her retirement savings to cover her bills. A chunk of it goes toward paying college bills — for her grandson Gage. She anticipates doing the same for Gage’s younger brother, Mason, when he graduates from high school in another year. Every stitch of their clothing, all of their meals and day-to-day expenses have been her responsibility since 2003, when drug use by her daughter and son-in-law prompted the police to remove the children from their home…”
  • ‘It’s like a tsunami’: Opioid epidemic pushes kids into foster care, By Sandra Tan, October 22, 2017, Buffalo News: “The opioid epidemic is not just killing hundreds of local residents  – it’s leaving hundreds of Erie County children without a home or at risk of being removed from one. They are orphaned children and they are the children of drug-addicted parents no longer able to care for them. Erie County Family Court Judge Lisa Bloch Rodwin has presided at thousands of child abuse and neglect cases since 2011. She can’t recall any cases related to opioid drug abuse four years ago, and only a handful three years ago…”

Maternal Mortality

IRP Children and Families News - Thu, 10/26/2017 - 13:31

The quiet crisis among African Americans: Pregnancy and childbirth are killing women at inexplicable rates, By Ann M. Simmons, October 26, 2017, Los Angeles Times: “Three weeks after Cassaundra Lynn Perkins gave birth to premature twins, she returned to the hospital, feeling unwell. She phoned her mother from her hospital bed at 3:30 in the morning. ‘I’m just not feeling good,’ she said. Surely it was just another bout of the mysterious illness her daughter had been suffering from for most of her pregnancy, Cheryl Givens-Perkins thought as she rushed over to San Antonio’s North Central Baptist Hospital…”

Adverse Childhood Experiences

IRP Children and Families News - Fri, 10/20/2017 - 13:29
  • Massachusetts scores well on childhood trauma, but nearly 40 percent of children are still affected, By Dan Glaun, October 19, 2017, MassLive.com: “When children experience stressful or traumatic events, the effects can be long lasting and severe.  Suicide attempts, alcohol and drug abuse, high risk sexual behaviors and criminal convictions are all more common among people who grew up with what researchers call ‘adverse childhood experiences,’ according to multiple studies. And according to a new analysis by the Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, 38.8 percent of Massachusetts children have had at least one ACE — well below the national average of 46 percent…”
  • More than 40 percent of Maryland children experience traumatic events, By Meredith Cohn, October 19, 2017, Baltimore Sun: “More than four out of 10 children in Maryland have experienced a traumatic event such as the death or incarceration of a parent, or a drug addiction or mental health problem of a family member, according to a new analysis of national data. Nationally, the so-called adverse childhood experiences, or ACEs, were even more widespread with 46 percent of children reporting at least one, according to the analysis by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Child & Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative done in collaboration with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation…”

Foster Care Payments to Relatives – Kentucky

IRP Children and Families News - Fri, 10/20/2017 - 13:21

State working out how to pay relatives who provide foster care under recent court decision, By Deborah Yetter, October 17, 2017, Louisville Courier-Journal: “Kentucky’s top human services official said Tuesday that the state will comply with a court order to pay relatives who provide free foster care the same as they do licensed foster families. But Vickie Yates Brown Glisson, secretary of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services, said the cabinet is still analyzing how to apply the court decision. ‘Our legal team is studying it,’ she said in a brief interview. The court decision comes as a growing number of relatives, many of them grandparents, are caring for children removed from homes because of abuse or neglect and say the extra costs have caused them to burn through retirement savings and raise the children in poverty…”

Welfare Reform – Ohio

IRP Children and Families News - Wed, 10/18/2017 - 15:00

20 years after welfare reform, are Ohio’s poor any better off?, By Catherine Candisky, October 15, 2017, Columbus Dispatch: “It’s been seven years since Laura Staten hit rock bottom, but talking about it still makes her cry. With her 1 1/2-year-old son, their belongings stuffed into two trash bags, and less than $100 in her pocket, Staten fled an abusive marriage, unsure how to build a new life but determined to do it. ‘I had nothing,’ said the 33-year-old preschool teacher from Bremen, her voice quivering. With new restrictions on welfare, she learned that help from the government would be limited…”

Kids Count Report – Illinois

IRP Children and Families News - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 15:24

Report: For Illinois youth, future success tied to education funding, By Maudlyne Ihejirika, October 13, 2017, Chicago Sun-Times: “An annual tracking of child well-being finds huge gaps statewide in educational access and achievement that spans birth through college, and disproportionally affects low-income and minority children…”

Kids Count Report – Colorado

IRP Children and Families News - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 15:21

Annual ‘Kids Count’ report reveals lower child poverty rates, racial disparity in Weld County, By Kelly Ragan, October 12, 2017, Greeley Tribune: “Fewer children in Weld County are living in poverty than have in many years, which is a sign of recovery from the Great Recession, according to the annual ‘Kids Count in Colorado!’ report…”

State Children’s Health Insurance Program

IRP Children and Families News - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 15:02
  • Funding disagreements put Children’s Health Insurance Program at risk, By Caroline Kelly, October 12, 2017, Dallas News: “Children’s health advocates are worried that lawmakers’ different ideas about how to fund a federal insurance program will leave nearly 1 million Texas children without coverage.  House and Senate committees each approved bills last week to renew the Children’s Health Insurance Program, which expired Sept. 30, for five years. Most states have leftover CHIP funds, but four expect to run out by December. Last week, the Texas Health and Human Services Commission estimated that the state program would run out of funding in January instead of February, in part because of demands following Hurricane Harvey…”
  • These 5 states just got a little money to continue CHIP, By Michael Ollove, October 12, 2017, Stateline: “While Congress has failed to restore funding to the popular Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), the Trump administration has made $230 million in excess funds from previous years available to five states and four U.S. territories that were in danger of running out of money the soonest…”

Child Support System – Ohio

IRP Children and Families News - Fri, 10/06/2017 - 15:03

Ohio’s child support system rife with fraud, poor collection rates, By Laura A. Bischoff, October 5, 2017, Dayton Daily News: “Ohio’s child support system is riddled with problems, including billions in unpaid support and an outdated formula that some believe contributes to non-custodial parents moving to the underground economy to avoid wage garnishments. Unpaid support on the books, accumulated since 1976, totals a staggering $4.5 billion in Ohio and every year another $100 million piles onto that figure, according to David Fleischman, bureau chief in the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services child support office. Complicating collections is that 69 percent of the debt is owed by parents who had reported earnings of less than $10,000, according to Susan Brown, director of the Franklin County Child Support Enforcement Agency…”

State Children’s Health Insurance Program

IRP Children and Families News - Fri, 10/06/2017 - 14:55

States scramble to overcome Congress’ failure to move on CHIP, By Michael Ollove, October 6, 2017, Stateline: “By failing to reauthorize the Children’s Health Insurance Program before last week’s deadline, Congress has nudged the state of Minnesota toward a painful solution to the loss of federal funds: Unless it can find $95 million, the state said it will continue to provide full health care for certain low-income pregnant women in the program, while either reducing the number of children eligible for CHIP or scaling back their benefits.  That is the sort of agonizing choice that all states in the country will face in the coming months unless Congress acts quickly to restore federal funding to a program that is immensely popular with both parties…”

Child Poverty

IRP Children and Families News - Fri, 10/06/2017 - 14:53
  • America’s child-poverty rate has hit a record low, By Annie Lowrey, October 5, 2017, The Atlantic: “The economy is nearing full employment. The stock market is at record highs. The expansion keeps continuing. Add to that one more very good piece of economic news: The child-poverty rate fell to a record low in 2016.  That finding comes from a new analysis of government and academic data by Isaac Shapiro and Danilo Trisi, both researchers at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a nonpartisan, Washington-based think tank. The child-poverty rate declined to 15.6 percent in 2016, the researchers found, down from a post-recession high of 18.1 percent in 2012 and from 28.4 percent in 1967. That means that roughly 11.5 million kids were living in households below the poverty threshold last year…”
  • Brownback touts child poverty drop, but progress uneven, By Jonathan Shorman, October 2, 2017, Wichita Eagle: “The figure is eye-catching: The number of Kansas children in poverty dropped by 26 percent over the past five years. Gov. Sam Brownback touted that statistic and others this week, directly linking the decline to his welfare policies. ‘By encouraging work over reliance, we have broken the cycle of poverty for thousands of Kansans,’ Brownback said. ‘Our policies are good for Kansas families, the economy and taxpayers.’ But there’s more to the numbers than meets the eye…”

Child Poverty – Dallas, TX

IRP Children and Families News - Fri, 09/29/2017 - 14:58

Dallas’ child poverty rate drops, but still high compared to other major U.S. cities, By Tristan Hallman, September 26, 2017, Dallas News:”Dallas is no longer home to highest percentage of children living in poverty in major U.S. cities, according to new estimates released by the U.S. Census Bureau. The Mayor’s Poverty Task Force on Tuesday announced that the rate has fallen over the last three years. From 2014 to 2016, the American Community Survey’s estimates showed that 26,000 fewer Dallas children are living in poverty — dropping the rate to 30.6 percent from 37.8 percent. The overall poverty rate also fell, and the city has a relatively low rate among residents 65 and older…”

Child Poverty – Staten Island, NY

IRP Children and Families News - Fri, 09/29/2017 - 14:55

Census data shows rise in child poverty on Staten Island, By Thomas Erik Bascome, September 27, 2017, silive.com: “Recent data shows Staten Island was the lone borough to report an increase in child poverty rates from 2015 to 2016. At 19.1 percent, the child poverty rate in the borough is up from 2015, and still 4.3 percent higher than it was before the 2008 recession, according to Census Bureau data…”

Kids Count Report – Alabama

IRP Children and Families News - Wed, 09/27/2017 - 13:52
  • Kids Count: Poverty rates are up; hunger stats have stabilized, By Lisa Singleton-Rickman, September 25, 2017, Times Daily: “The recently released Kids Count 2017 data didn’t come as a shock to Sarah Jennifer Thompson, especially in the area of childhood poverty. The founder of Sydney’s Safe Foundation has been fighting child hunger for a decade, the past seven years of which has included sending weekend food home with qualifying low-income students…”
  • Alabama teen pregnancy rate is at historic low, while poverty remains high, By Kym Klass, September 18, 2017, Montgomery Advertiser: “The number of children living in poverty continues to be high in Alabama, while the state’s teen pregnancy rate is at a historic low, according to the just-released Alabama Kids Count Data Book, produced by VOICES for Alabama’s Children…”
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